‎Wherever you go, there you are.


Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics  ,Daniel Kahneman reveals how our “experiencing selves” and our “remembering selves” perceive happiness differently. This new insight has profound implications for economics, public policy — and our own self-awareness.

Behavioral economics key observations:

Three themes predominate in behavioral finance and economics:[13]

  • Heuristics: People often make decisions based on approximate rules of thumb, not strict logic. See also cognitive biases and bounded rationality.
  • Framing: The collection of anecdotes and stereotypes that make up the mental emotional filters individuals rely on to understand and respond to events.
  • Market inefficiencies: These include mis-pricings, non-rational decision making, and return anomalies. Richard Thaler, in particular, has described specific market anomalies from a behavioral perspective.

via wikipedia.org

varianta cu subtitrare in romaneste aici 

*** Stumbling on Happiness

What can and can’t people tell us about their current emotional state, and are the things they tell us the best measure—or perhaps even the only measure—of their happiness?

Gilbert’s central thesis is that, through perception and cognitive biases, people imagine the future poorly, in particular what will make them happy. He argues that imagination fails in three ways:[1]

  1. Imagination tends to add and remove details, but people do not realize that key details may be fabricated or missing from the imagined scenario.
  2. Imagined futures (and pasts) are more like the present than they actually will be (or were).
  3. Imagination fails to realize that things will feel differently once they actually happen — most notably, the psychological immune system will make bad things feel not so bad as they are imagined to feel.

The advice Gilbert offers is to use other people’s experiences to predict the future, instead of imagining it. It is surprising how similar people are in much of their experiences, he says. He does not expect too many people to heed this advice, as our culture, accompanied by various thinking tendencies, is against this method of decision making.

Also, Gilbert covers the topic of ‘filling in’ or the frequent use of patterns, by the mind, to connect events which we do actually recall with other events we expect or anticipate fit into the expected experience. This ‘filling in’ is also used by our eyes and optic nerves to remove our blind spot or scotoma, and instead substitute what our mind expects to be present in the blind spot.

This accessible book is written for the layperson, generally avoiding abstruse terminology and explaining common quirks of reasoning through the simple experiments that exploited them (this excludes the term “super-replicator”).

varianta cu subtitrare in romaneste  aici  

Outside Looking In \ Inside Looking Out like water

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/As_Slow_As_Possible

still.whole

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